Bearded princess wears the crown
PERHAPS L. Ron Hubbard was right and science fiction is the destiny of religion. 
This trio of substantial short works, presented as part of Chunky Move’s Next Move program, quickly dispenses with conventional religion (the lines of birds by Paea Leach), then technological utopianism (Fountain by Atlanta Eke), and leaves us with an extraterrestrial messiah (Princess by Benjamin Hancock).
Leach takes religious iconography (Pieta, for example) and the gestures of observance — the outstretched arms of priestly blessing, an abstracted sign of the cross, the clasped fingers of prayer and so on — and makes a dance for god.
Indeed, you’d need to be omnipresent to actually see more than a third of the piece. It begins before the audience is in place and a substantial proportion is performed either in the dark, out of range or out of sight to one seating bank or the other.
Though Leach performs the piece with Michaela Pegum and Gregory Lorenzutti — two dynamic and exceptionally beautiful dancers — the lines of birds is unfocused and oddly banal. The choreography struggles to hold our attention.
In stark contrast, Eke’s Fountain uses the mystery and grotesquerie of Frankenstein science (think deformed fetuses and jars of formaldehyde) to make her point. Or, rather, to ask her questions; to think aloud.
But, as in Leach’s work, there’s plenty happening out of sight. More of a conceptual artist than dance maker, Eke tells us that her work is 220 minutes, divvied up into 11 20-minute instalments. We have to infer what has come before and imagine what will follow.
In this evening-long stalemate between church and laboratory, Benjamin Hancock crowns himself in the ironically titled Princess. With kinked thumbs opposed to little fingers, he places a figurative crown on his head. He’s a human maypole, streamers attached; a spinning top; and he holds his centre with brash assurance. Self-belief seems to hold him upright rather than mere skill. His balance is so canny, he introduces a wobble — a wild, off-centre twirl — to show off his ability to re-find his centre. His robotic economy of movement gives way to something dervish-like.
Intriguingly, Hancock isn’t entertaining the masses; it’s absolutely apparent that he’s leading them, like some extraterrestrial Evita.
Just as Christianity adopted and adapted the rituals and festivals of the pagan world, Hancock’s bearded princess steals back the Promethean fire.
Tickets: $30. Bookings: trybooking.com. Duration: 100min, including interval. Season ends June 29. 

Chris Boyd
The Australian
June 23, 2014 12:00AM

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/bearded-princess-wears-the-crown/story-e6frg8n6-1226962975766#

Bearded princess wears the crown

PERHAPS L. Ron Hubbard was right and science fiction is the destiny of religion.

This trio of substantial short works, presented as part of Chunky Move’s Next Move program, quickly dispenses with conventional religion (the lines of birds by Paea Leach), then technological utopianism (Fountain by Atlanta Eke), and leaves us with an extraterrestrial messiah (Princess by Benjamin Hancock).

Leach takes religious iconography (Pieta, for example) and the gestures of observance — the outstretched arms of priestly blessing, an abstracted sign of the cross,
the clasped fingers of prayer and so on — and makes a dance for god.

Indeed, you’d need to be omnipresent to actually see more than a third of the piece. It begins before the audience is in place and a substantial proportion is performed either in the dark, out of range or out of sight to one seating bank or the other.

Though Leach performs the piece with Michaela Pegum and Gregory Lorenzutti — two dynamic and exceptionally beautiful dancers — the lines of birds is unfocused and oddly banal. The choreography struggles to hold our attention.

In stark contrast, Eke’s Fountain uses the mystery and grotesquerie of Frankenstein science (think deformed fetuses and jars of formaldehyde) to make her point. Or, rather, to ask her questions; to think aloud.

But, as in Leach’s work, there’s plenty happening out of sight. More of a conceptual artist than dance maker, Eke tells us that her work is 220 minutes, divvied up into 11 20-minute instalments. We have to infer what has come before and imagine what will follow.

In this evening-long stalemate between church and laboratory, Benjamin Hancock crowns himself in the ironically titled Princess. With kinked thumbs opposed to little fingers, he places a figurative crown on his head. He’s a human maypole, streamers attached; a spinning top; and he holds his centre with brash assurance. Self-belief seems to hold him upright rather than mere skill. His balance is so canny, he introduces a wobble — a wild, off-centre twirl — to show off his ability to re-find his centre. His robotic economy of movement gives way to something dervish-like.

Intriguingly, Hancock isn’t entertaining the masses; it’s absolutely apparent that he’s leading them, like some extraterrestrial Evita.

Just as Christianity adopted and adapted the rituals and festivals of the pagan world, Hancock’s bearded princess steals back the Promethean fire.

Tickets: $30. Bookings: trybooking.com. Duration: 100min, including interval. Season ends June 29.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/bearded-princess-wears-the-crown/story-e6frg8n6-1226962975766#

HEX

James Welsby

Next Wave Festival 2014

The piece involves three Generation Y contemporary dance artists traversing the arc of the HIV/ AIDS crisis (circa 1981 – 1996) to better understand contemporary issues of health, identity, community, and history. This project aims to combine contemporary dance with queer performance languages; HEX takes queer performance out of the nightclubs and places it within a contemporary arts forum that can critically engage with the work’s themes whilst remaining accessible for non-arts audiences. The work embraces humour, reverence and intense sorrow, in a series of intimate, choreographed vignettes. These vignettes seek to provide the audience with an experience of both celebration and reflection as the show depicts evolving club-dance styles that coincide with the timeline of the Western HIV/AIDS epidemic.

http://jameswelsby.com/

http://nextwave.org.au/

http://www.fortyfivedownstairs.com/

Performers: Chafia Brooks, Benjamin Hancock, James Welsby

Sound: Claudio Tocco

Lighting & Set Design: Rose Connors Dance

Stage Manager: Anastasia Ryan

Costume: Bryn Meredith

Research assistant: Dion Kagan

Associate Producers at Next Wave: Kristy Ayre & Kyle Kremerskothen

Photos: Gregory Lorenzutti & Alice Hutchison

PRINCESS

PRINCESS places the performer as the Dynast. The one whose inheritance strongly influences and contributes to the practice they perform.

They are the Ruler of the body in which they exist. They have the power to create their own Kingdom; A house of observation, architecture, interest, ideas, and possibilities.

Creating a Kingdom one must; choose the people, invent the flag, notate the national anthem, define the laws and principles and banish any one who breaks them.

Melbourne Now February Solo Series
Venue: The Drawing Room - NGV Australia - The Ian Potter Centre. ngv.vic.gov.au/melbournenow

Creator/Performer: Benjamin Hancock hancockbenjamin.tumblr.com/
Costume: Jack Hancock tackjancock.com/
Film/Photo: Mischa Baka baka.net.au/
Curated by: Antony Hamilton antonyhamiltonprojects.com/home.html
Produced by: Megafun megafun.com.au/
Hair: Fur Hairdressing City Square furhairdressing.com/

Written and performed by Super Wild Horses
Taken from the album ‘Crosswords’ Out Now on Dot Dash (AUS) + Revolver (USA)
USA, Buy it here: http://www.midheaven.com/
AUS, Buy it here: http://www.planetofsound.com/Home

Directed & Edited by Timothy Hillier
Choreography & performance by Benjamin Hancock and James Andrews
Costume Designer Jack Hancock
Assistant Blake Ross
Special thanks to Ben & Grace at Ben’s Camera Hire

Check out the artists Tumblrs!

James Andrews: http://jnadance.tumblr.com/                           http://choirboyhotel.tumblr.com/

Jack Hancock: tackjancock.com/

REFLECTIONS For Melbourne Spring Fashion Week 2013

The film celebrates the notion that fashion in Melbourne is more than the clothes we wear - it is all around us. Featuring a number of iconic locations and well—loved fashion personalities, Reflections invites you to come on a whimsical adventure into the creative heart of our city.

Melbourne Spring Fashion Week 2013 runs from 31 August to 8 September. For more information and where to buy tickets visit www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/msfw

Commissioner: City of Melbourne (Melbourne Spring Fashion Week)
Directed by: Folie à Deux
Producer: Dean Drieberg

FANTASY
Choreographer/Performer: Benjamin Hancock

Filming: Boom Media

I want to be a famous fan; I want to exist in a whirlwind of fantasy, praising and worshiping my idols. I also want to embody the power and presence of fame, exploring my importance in space and spotlight.

music: I respect that the music is not my own but that of
anbb: alva noto & blixa bargeld  Fall

The Abramovic Method Practiced by Lady Gaga